FLASHING BLINKY LIGHT VIDEO

Loading...

Stick Glow Size Chart
















Stick Glow Size Chart

Flashing Blinky Lights...
Glow sticks (also called light sticks) are lots of fun. You can get glow sticks in many different colors (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, pink, white, or aqua). You can get your glow sticks wrapped or unwrapped. Most glow sticks have a hook or clip at the end which can be used to hang the glow stick onto something.

Our lights sticks come in five sizes: 1.5 inches, 4 inches, 6 inches, 12 inches, and 15 inches. Glow sticks can either glow for a long time or brightly for a short time. The "burn time" depends on the formula that is used, on the length, on the fill level, on the color, and on the chemicals used. The glow times for each glow stick are listed at the top of each category or on the stick.

To activate your light stick, just bend the stick until you hear the stick make a popping sound. There are 2 liquids inside the stick. One liquid is inside of a glass ampule and that is what you hear "popping" when you bend the stick to activate it. The glow stick will start glowing when the two liquids mix together.

Glow sticks do not have an on/off switch. Once activated, the stick will glow until it burns itself out. It is possible to temporarily stop the glow by freezing the stick, but freezing will not rejuvenate the stick. When the stick thaws out, it will start back up where it left off. If there is any glow left when the stick is frozen, it will glow at the same level when it thaws out.
Flashing Blinky Lights...

Can you explain how something can glow-in-the-dark?



Can you explain how something can glow-in-the-dark?
Flashing Blinky Lights...
Products that glow in the dark do so because electrons are falling from a higher orbit to a lower orbit. When they fall to a lower orbit, they emit energy as visible light. Glow products fall into 2 different categories: chemiluminescent products (chemical necklaces and light sticks) and photoluminescent products like our paints and gloves.

The first category is chemiluminescent products. These products are like the chemical necklaces and light sticks that you can purchase from Extreme Glow. A chemical reaction is taking place. (Two chemicals react with each other to become one chemical.) When the reaction occurs, the electrons in the new product get excited, and they emit light when the electrons fall back into their normal orbits.

The second category is photoluminescent products. These products have chemicals in them with electrons that get excited by light waves. No chemical reaction actually occurs. When removed from the light source, the electrons will fall back into their normal place and emit light in the process. That is the glow that you see. There are two basic chemicals for photoluminescence. One is Zinc Sulfide, and the other is Strontium Aluminate. The Zinc Sulfide product is what you get in most glow products. (stars, moons, etc.) It will glow for about 5 minutes after the light source is removed. Strontium Aluminate will glow for up to 40 hours depending upon the type of charge it receives, the temperature of the substance, etc.

We use the strontium aluminate in our re-chargeable products, and we claim up to 14 hours of glow based on typical average temperatures and proper charging.
Flashing Blinky Lights...

What will happen if I put my chemical glow necklace in the freezer?


















What will happen if I put my chemical glow necklace in the freezer?
You cannot regenerate a glow necklace by sticking it in the freezer. You can "suspend "the chemical reaction that is taking place inside your chemical glow necklace by placing it in the freezer.

If your glow necklace is rated for 6 hours, placing it in the freezer will not extend that rating, however, it is possible to get multiple uses from the same necklace. If you used the necklace for 2 hours then put it in the freezer, you will stop the chemical reaction that is causing the glow. When you thaw the necklace out again, the chemical reaction will start again. You would have about 4 hours remaining on the glow in this situation.
Flashing Blinky Lights...

How does a lightstick work and what are the chemicals inside the stick?















How does a lightstick work and what are the chemicals inside the stick?
All of the chemical glow products (glowsticks® , bracelets, necklaces, lightsticks, etc.) contain a small thin-walled glass ampoule on the inside. The ampoule contains a solution of hydrogen peroxide (a form of it is used as a topical anti-infective) dissolved in phthalic ester. The chemical that surrounds the glass ampoule is a phenyl oxalate ester along with the appropriate dye. When you activate the product by bending it - you hear a little snap. The snap that you hear is actually the glass ampoule breaking. The chemicals inside the ampoule are then released and mixed with the chemicals that once surrounded the ampoule. Immediately, a chemical reaction occurs and the molecules are energized. The molecules release their energy as visible light. The process in which energy from a chemical reaction is released directly as light is called chemiluminescence. The chemicals are non-toxic and non-flammable, however, they may permanently stain clothing, furniture, carpet etc. Contact with the skin or eyes may cause some temporary discomfort. Rinse thoroughly with water if the chemicals come in contact with your skin or eyes.
Flashing Blinky Lights-batteries.

FLASHING BLINKY LIGHTS BATTERIES












FLASHING BLINKY LIGHTS BATTERIES
While a few flashing blinkies are made to be used once (like glowsticks), most can be reused with a fresh set of batteries. Typical blinkies use two to three AG3/AG4, SG3/SG4, or two CR927 batteries (see List of battery sizes). Where the same sized battery is available in alkaline or silver oxide chemistry types, silver oxide is preferred as they are longer lasting. Although such batteries cost about $3-$5 at watch and drug stores, they can be had for $15 per hundred from online stores. (However, watch stores usually install the battery in your watch, which can be very difficult, while flashing blinkies are usually just 'twist, remove, replace, and twist'. With some blinkies, take care to retain the insulating plastic or tape around the outer ring of the set of two or three batteries.)

USES OF FLASHING BLINKY LIGHTS















USES OF FLASHING BLINKY LIGHTS
Most often Flashing Blinky lights are used for amusement at raves, parties and night time events. But they can have other uses as well such as:

* Blinkies imprinted with company logos at conventions.
* Safety lights for children during Halloween, or night time events.
* Fun and safety during camping trips.
* Emergency flashers for disabled automobiles or lost hikers (most blinkies have over a 1 mile visibility range at night).
* The term Flashing Blinky is often used for bicycle lights which flash. In some countries blinkies can be used as a primary light on a bicycle.
* Flashing Blinkies also can be attached to mobiles (cell phones). When the mobile turns on, make a call, receive a call and during calls the blinky will keep flashing.
* "Winky blinkies" can refer to stage and film props which display lighting effects, or "gags," during a dramatic production

CONSTRUCTION OF FLASHING BLINKY LIGHTS

















CONSTRUCTION OF FLASHING BLINKY LIGHTS

Flashing blinky lights Body

A typical flashing blinky lights is a small metal cylinder that has threads on one end and a very small etched circuit board on the other. The threaded end is open to accept small button cell batteries, and another cylinder that screws on to hold them in place. The circuit board can be round and inside the cylinder, or larger, shaped, and glued to the outside of the cylinder end. Common designs have a rubber gasket inside the front (between the batteries and circuit board). Tightening the base causes the gasket to flatten and allows the batteries to complete the circuit with the back of the circuit board.

Flashing blinky lights Back

The most common designs use a set of strong magnets, one at the back of the Body Light, and another that can be removed. This allows the Body Light to be easily attached to clothes, or stuck on any magnetic metal such as buttons or belt buckles. Clips are often used to make earrings, a loop can make a pendant, or a ring can be welded to the back to make a finger ring. Double sided adhesive pads are sometimes used to stick the blinky directly to the body, most often in the navel.

Flashing blinky lights Circuit board

The circuit board typically has anywhere from 2 to as many as 25 micro-LEDs. Current LED technology allows for every colour of the rainbow, even infra-red (for military/police), and ultra-violet (black light). Blue, white, violet, and ultra-violet LEDs often need 2 or more batteries because of their high voltage requirements. Because it is an etched circuit board the front can be constructed to flash in a variety of ways, especially where there are multiple LEDs in multiple colours. A clear plastic material such as silicone, acrylic or epoxy protects the fragile LEDs on the front (outside) of the board. Shaped boards have literally hundreds of variations combined with imprinting. Common shapes (besides the classic small round) are stars, hearts, flowers, flags, animals, holiday symbols (like Halloween jack-o-lanterns), and sports team logos.